Mother’s Day Printables

Mother’s Day is this Sunday and we have lots of great cutouts which will make for a touching Mother’s Day gift.

Our Mother’s Day printables include a hand-shaped Mother’s Day card, a cutout box to hold mom’s favorite treats and a personalized Mother’s Day eBook that will be fun for everyone.

Free Mother's Day Printables

Free Mother’s Day Printables

Mother’s Day Printables: Hand Shaped Mother’s Day Card

The signs for “Happy”, “Mother” and “Day” are sandwiched in between two hands in the shape of the ASL sign for “I Love You’. This accordion style card has the words outlined for the children to trace and fill in.

To assemble this card, just print out the attached file and cut along the dark pink lines and fold along the light grey lines. The long panel with “Happy”, “Mother” and “Day” should be folded in an accordion style as you can see in the photo below.

Mother's Day Printable Card

Mother’s Day Printable Card

Mother's Day Printable Card

Mother’s Day Printable Card

Mother’s Day Printables: Mother’s Day Candy/Treat Box

Our talented illustrator Sarah Kronick of www.skillustrations has created a timeless image of a mother being served breakfast in bed as well as the signs for “Happy”, “Mother” and “Day”. They are all wrapped up in a cute little candy box filled with mom’s favorite treats.

To assemble this Mother’s Day box, print out the file. Cut along the dark pink line and fold along the light grey lines. Glue in the areas marked “Glue Here” and you’re done! Now for the fun part – add mom’s favorite candies and treats – remember to taste some too! (Quality control is a very important step!) For an added touch you can glue a nice bow made out of ribbon as pictured in the first photo above.

Mother's Day Printable Box

Mother’s Day Printable Box

Mother’s Day Printables: “All About My Mom” eBook

Beautifully illustrated by Sarah Kronick, this Mother’s Day printable eBook will be fun for the kids to fill out and even more fun for mom to receive. You will likely enjoy seeing some of the answers your kids come up with. It may be an eye opener to see what they know. Seeing yourself through your children’s eyes is priceless!

To assemble our Mother’s Day eBook:

1. Print out the attached file in your choice of color or black and white.

2. Fold the pages in half with the images on the outside..

3. Arrange all the pages in numerical order, cut the cover page along the middle dotted lines and place the numbered pages inside the front and back covers.

4. Put two staples down the left side of the book (behind the dotted lines)

5. Cut a piece of masking tape the same length as the height of the book and tape down the side covering the staples on both sides. This is an optional step but is highly recommended as the sharp ends of the staples could hurt little fingers!

allaboutmymom-mothersdayprintable-ad

Mother’s Day Printable eBook: All About My Mom – Black & White

Mother’s Day Printable eBook: All About My Mom – Color

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ASL Alphabet Chart and ASL Alphabet Flashcards

ASL Alphabet Chart and ASL Alphabet Flashcards

ASL Alphabet Chart and ASL Alphabet Flashcards

The Age of Learning, Inc. – the company that created the award-winning early childhood education website ABCmouse.com Early Learning Academy – released a report that surveyed kindergarten teachers nationwide (in the United States) about the preparedness of children entering kindergarten. They found that most are not adequately prepared. To be prepared they should be able to recite the alphabet in order. They should also be able to recognize and name a letter in both uppercase and lowercase when seeing the letter as well as when asked to point one out of a group. Not all children can do this and some would argue that they eventually learn them so whats the big deal?

As a parent, I feel kindergarten is about socializing and learning the skills necessary for dealing with other children, authority figures and rules. When I help in my son’s kindergarten class, I see many children struggling with writing their names and tracing basic letters and numbers (things they are expected to do before they’re allowed to go have snack or play). For both my boys, knowing the alphabet saved them from having to use all their “free time” on work and therefore they had more time for play. Frankly a play based kindergarten class should be just that – play! Showing the boys that school can be fun puts them in the right frame of mind for learning at school and sets the stage for that to continue in the later years. Would you want your child in kindergarten to already regard school as hard work and have a negative impression of what education is all about? They say a child’s first teacher is their parent – I truly believe this and have always taken a proactive approach to teaching them things myself especially in the early years.

So how can you start helping your baby to recognize the letters in the alphabet? Alphabet charts and flashcards are popular tools that many parents use and swear by. I have used them as well and definitely agree. To take it to the next level, I would suggest incorporating sign language into your flashcards and charts. An ASL alphabet chart and ASL alphabet flashcards make a significant difference!

Make use of an ASL alphabet chart and ASL alphabet flashcards

I taught both my boys sign language when they were babies and introduced them to the alphabet in ASL. Allowing my boys to experience the alphabet with a combination of sounds, images and gestures helped them to absorb and begin to recognize the alphabet quickly. Not only did they begin to recognize the letters but they could also start to finger spell simple 2 or 3 letter words by the age of 4. This was all mostly from their memory but it surely gave them a great head start when they started kindergarten. The use of the hand gestures helped them to remember which letters came next in the words they were spelling. They both could spell and recognize their names, which are 5 and 6 letters long! It is a known fact that the more senses you engage while learning, the more your brain retains the information.

So without delay, below you will find a printable ASL alphabet chart and ASL alphabet flashcards.

Print out the ASL Alphabet Chart and ASL Alphabet Flashcards on regular 8″x11″ paper or take it up a notch by printing them in full color on photo paper. You can also laminate them to help them last longer and be baby friendly or cut out the flashcards and insert them into a photo album or inside old dvd cases – this turns them into something more fun and hands on for your child.

Print in color, black and white or printer-friendly versions:

ASL Alphabet Flashcards - Full Colored

ASL Alphabet Flashcards – Full Colored

ASL Alphabet Flashcards - Black and White

ASL Alphabet Flashcards – Black and White

ASL Alphabet Flashcards - Printer Friendly

ASL Alphabet Flashcards – Printer Friendly

ASL Alphabet Chart - Full Color

ASL Alphabet Chart – Full Color

ASL Alphabet Chart - Black and White

ASL Alphabet Chart – Black and White

ASL Alphabet Chart - Printer Friendly

ASL Alphabet Chart – Printer Friendly

So now that you have the ASL alphabet chart and ASL alphabet flashcards, here are some ways to use them to help your child learn the alphabet.

– Singing the alphabet song never gets old! Try using the signs while singing with your toddler or have your child point at the letters on the ASL alphabet chart and ASL alphabet flashcards while you sign the letters. They will eventually be able to sign the letters with you.

– Sign and say the letters in their name, place the ASL flashcards with the letters of their name out and get them to put them in the right order. Give them hints by signing the letters and getting them to associate what you’re signing with the sign on the correct letter flashcard. You could do this with the ASL chart as well – just get them to point to the letters in the right order. Be sure to get them to say the letter in the process.

– Teach them how to sign their name by saying each letter while signing it to them. Go slowly so they can follow. Point at each letter on the ASL alphabet chart and ASL alphabet flashcards as you sign the letter.

– Scramble up the ASL flashcards and get them to put them back in alphabetical order – giving them hints with signs when they need help.

– Using the ASL alphabet chart and ASL alphabet flashcards, sign a letter to them and ask them to find it on the chart or on the flashcards. Get them to say the letter.

– When they’re able to make the signs, a fun game is to finger spell words with them. It will become like a fun secret language.

– You could also start to introduce phonetics to them by singing songs like “The ‘A’ says ‘ahh’, the ‘B’ says ‘baaa” etc.. and signing all along and pointing to the letters in the ASL alphabet chart and ASL alphabet flashcards.

If you have any other ideas or have tried these things please comment below and let us know how it went! The more we share, the more we learn!

Check out our ASL Numbers Charts and ASL Numbers Flashcards too!

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